Irrigation optimized of Cedrella fissilis seedlings

09/01/2016 Comments off

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Communications in Plant Sciences, vol 6, issues 3-4, p.39-45, 2016

Full title: Irrigation optimized of Cedrella fissilis seedlings

Authors: Ângela Simone Freitag Lima, Toshio Nishijima, Weslley Wilker Corrêa Morais, and Antônio Natal Gonçalves

Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of irrigation intensity in development of Cedrella fissilis seedlings in the greenhouse. The statistical design was randomized blocks, arranged in a  bi-factorial design with split plot with three replications. As main plot was characterized for irrigation frequencies (treatments): T1 – one time irrigation daily (at 11h00min); T2 – two times irrigation daily (at 11h00min and 19h00min); T3 – three times irrigation daily (at 07 h00min, 11h00min, and 19h00min) and T4 – four times irrigation daily (at 07h00min, 11h00min, 15h00min, and 19h00min) and as a sub-portion eight times week assessment, and an eighth hardening phase. For the experiment was used a system of localized irrigation, consisting of: pump, irrigation nozzles, tubes and valves. The seedlings were grown in plastic containers (tubes) suspended for PVC trays. Data were collected weekly, obtaining the height and diameter of the seedlings, dry mass production and the number of sheets in each evaluation. After the analysis it was concluded that the frequency of the three irrigations per day showed the C. fissilis seedlings with better development and able to go to the field.

Keywords: Cedar, Water, Optimization, Biomass, Development.

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Predicting red cypress vine leaf area by a linear equation

08/31/2016 Comments off

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Communications in Plant Sciences, vol 6, issues 3-4, p.35-37, 2016

Full title: Predicting red cypress vine leaf area by a linear equation

Authors: Elise Antero Alves and Leonardo Bianco de Carvalho

Abstract: We aimed to determine a linear equation to predict the leaf area of Ipomoea quamoclit L. (red cypress vine), an important weed infesting perennial crops in Brazil and worldwide, as a function of leaf blade length and width. Leaves with no injuries were collect in several ecosystems. We electronically measured leaf blade maximum length through principal nervure (LBL), leaf blade maximum width perpendicular to principal nervure (LBW), and leaf blade area (LA), and then we calculated the product of LBL and LBW. A linear regression analysis performed to test the relation of LA and LBLxLBW. In addition, the Shapiro-Wilk test performed to test normality of regression residuals. The leaf area of red cypress vine could be calculated as a function of the product of leaf blade length and leaf blade width, by using the equation LA=11.987+3.6439*LBLxLBW.

Keywords: Ipomoea quamoclit, Leaf area, Non-linear estimation, Plant growth, Biometry.

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Studies on ethno medicinal plant diversity in an urban area – a case study

08/09/2016 Comments off

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Communications in Plant Sciences, vol 6, issues 3-4, p.27-34, 2016

Full title: Studies on ethno medicinal plant diversity in an urban area – a case study

Authors: Sudipta Biswas and Arnab Banerjee

Abstract: The present study deals with the Ethno-medicinal plants used by the local communities in Santragachhi area, under Howrah Municipal Corporation, ward no. 38, District Howrah, West Bengal, India. An ethno medicinal survey was carried out the use of medicinal plants in Santragachi region. The information was gathered from the local community people using an integrated approach botanical collections, group discussion and interview with questionnaire during 2012-2013. Among 50 informants interviewed, 10 were tribal practitioners. A total of 53 genera and 33 families are documented. In most of case, fresh parts of the plants were used for the preparation of medicine. The results further revealed that the natives of this area are not very much practiced in using the medicinal plants in the treatment of human illness. The study area is delimited by number of wetlands and the people collect the aquatic plants by their habitual knowledge as food resources. But due to expansion of city area, road construction causes loss of plant diversity and random exploitation of natural resources many valuable medicinal plants are at the stage of extinction. The present study documented ethno medicinal plants were mostly used for treatment of various diseases.

Keywords: Santragachi, West Bengal India, Traditional Knowlege, Disease, Phytodiversity.

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Sources, survival and transmission of Cryptosporiopsis sp., leaf and nut blight pathogen of cashew (Anacardium occidentale Linn)

07/05/2016 Comments off

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Communications in Plant Sciences, vol 6, issues 1-2, p.19-25, 2016

Full title: Sources, survival and transmission of Cryptosporiopsis sp., leaf and nut blight pathogen of cashew (Anacardium occidentale Linn)

Author: Menge Dominic and Shamte Shomari

Abstract: The germination of conidia was studied from 2 hours to 16 hours after incubation at an interval of two hours period. The germination of macroconidia microscopically was followed to understand the timing of key events. Ten infected cashew nuts were placed each on a Petri dish containing malt extract agar and incubated at 27 °C for 10 days. Cryptosporiopsis sp. pathogen was detected in nut samples of cashew clones. Leaf and nut blight pathogen remained viable up to one year in plant debris stored under laboratory condition at a minimum temperature range from 4 to 5 °C. There was a rapid population decline on viable counts of Cryptosporiopsis sp. recovered from sterile and unsterile soil after various periods of time. In debris buried at a depth of 7 cm in sterile or unsterile soil they survived for four months with 8% and 5% of disease samples with viable pathogen.  Saprophytic survival capacity of the fungus Cryptosporiopsis sp. in cashew field revealed that the pathogen survival was 80% up to four months of incubation but fell to 40% after 6 months. It was demonstrated that plant debris, soil and nuts could harbour sufficient inoculum to cause disease in new plants.

Keywords: Survival, Fungus, Viability, Conidia, Germination.

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Effect of sodium fluoride and sodium nitroprouside on Cicer arietinum and Pisum sativum

06/17/2016 Comments off

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Communications in Plant Sciences, vol 6, issues 1-2, p.13-18, 2016

Full title: Effect of sodium fluoride and sodium nitroprouside on Cicer arietinum and Pisum sativum

Author: Naba Kumar Mondal

Abstract: In present study, the individual and combine effect of sodium fluoride (NaF) and sodium nitroprouside (SNP) on germination and biochemical parameters (pigments, sugar, protein, amino acid, and phenol) of Bengal gram (Cicer arietinum) and peas (Pisum sativum) has been studied. After three days of NaF treatment, reductions were observed in percentage of seed germination, root and shoot length, and pigment content with increasing concentration of NaF (1 to 4 mg L-1). Seedlings treated with SNP, both alone and in combination of NaF, showed enhancement in seed germination as well as other growth parameters. NaF-treated seedlings were found to accumulate more soluble sugars and phenols, which were further increased by SNP treatment thereby indicating a synergistic effect of the possible reasons for the ameliorative effects of SNP in seedlings of Pisum sativum growing under NaF stress. Results also demonstrated that SNP application did not show any improvement in both morpho-physiologically and biochemically under sodium fluoride stress condition.

Keywords: Seedling growth, Biochemical parameters, Soil pollution, Phytointoxication, Ecological problem.

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Content and fluorescence of chlorophyll in eucalypt exposed to glyphosate

03/29/2016 Comments off

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Communications in Plant Sciences, vol 6, issues 1-2, p.07-11, 2016

Full title: Content and fluorescence of chlorophyll in eucalypt exposed to glyphosate

Authors: Leonardo Bianco de Carvalho, Pedro Luis da Costa Aguiar Alves, and Thiago Cavalcante Gomes Ribeiro de Andrade

Abstract: The objective was to evaluate the response of eucalypt clonal (Eucalyptus urograndis) regarding on chlorophyll content and fluorescence of chlorophyll after glyphosate spraying to verify if the herbicide affects the photochemical process of photosynthesis. Plants of four eucalypt clonal (C219, GG100, I144, and I224), having four expanded leaves, were sprayed with glyphosate in range of doses varying from 0 up to 720 g ae ha-1. We evaluated the chlorophyll content and the relation Fv/Fm during 30 days after spraying glyphosate. The chlorophyll content of the clone C219 reduced by 12% at doses ≥ 360 g ae ha-1. In addition, chlorophyll content was higher (≥ 12%) in all clonal from 7 days after spraying. The relation Fv/Fm did not alter after glyphosate spraying. We concluded that the efficiency of the photosystem II is not influenced by glyphosate in any studied eucalypt clonal, although doses of glyphosate from 360 g ae ha-1 affect the chlorophyll content of the clonal C219.

Keywords: Eucalyptus urograndis, N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine, Dose-response.

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Toxicity of As(III) and As(V) on morphological traits and pigments of Gram Seed (Cicer arietinum) during germination and early seedling growth

03/09/2016 Comments off

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Communications in Plant Sciences, vol 6, issues 1-2, p.01-06, 2016

Full title: Toxicity of As(III) and As(V) on morphological traits and pigments of Gram Seed (Cicer arietinum) during germination and early seedling growth

Authors: Naba Kumar Mondal, Kamalesh Sen, Arnab Banerjee, and Jayanta Kumar Datta

Abstract: Arsenic (As) contamination is an important environmental consequence in some part of India and other countries. In this study, we investigated that individual phytotoxicity of both As(III) and As(V) on Cicer arietinum. Total five different concentrations (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 mg/L) of both As(III) and As(V) have been considered for this study. Results indicate that percent germination significantly (p < 0.05) reduced with increasing concentration of both As(III) and As(V). However, As(III) showed pronounced effects than As(V). The variation of root and shoot length was equally affected by arsenite, where as arsenate showed higher negative impact on shoot length than root length up to the concentration 6 mg/L. However, arsenate concentration greater than 6 mg/L showed opposite trend of variation in root and shoot length. The pigment (Chlorophyll ‘a’, ‘b’ and total chlorophylls) and carotenoids level also gradually decrease with increasing concentration of both forms of arsenic.

Keywords: Arsenic, Morphophysiology, Germination, Root and shoot length, Chlorophyll content.

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